I-75 Crash Ejects Woman From Vehicle

On Tuesday, June 12, 2018, a 22 year old woman from Melvin, Michigan was ejected from her vehicle after being struck by a vehicle operated by a 23 year old woman from Roseville, Michigan. According to Click on Detroit, the car accident took place near Joslyn Road in Auburn Hills, Michigan. The driver at fault was operating a 2004 Pontiac Bonneville when she collided with a 2003 Chevrolet Blazer, while driving south on I-75. The impact caused both vehicles to roll down an embankment, at which point the 22 year old car crash victim was ejected from her vehicle. She was transported to McLaren Hospital in Pontiac, Michigan and it’s reported that she sustained serious car accident injuries. The other driver involved in the car crash was not harmed. While further details as to the cause of the car crash have not been released, Auburn Hills police are conducting an investigation into the accident.

For many people, the weekday begins and ends with driving on the highway. Whether it’s the commute to work, school, or other destination, “taking the usual route” can easily become too comfortable, and as a result, cause the driver to become less attentive to the road and other drivers. The reduced vigilance, paired with the fast highway speed limits, may result in dangerous car accidents and serious car accident injuries.

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It’s important to be alert, and drive safely whether on a crowded highway or an deserted suburban street. However, due to the dangerous nature of the highway, there are a few extra guidelines drivers should follow to ensure their safety, as well as the safety of other drivers. Below are ten safety tips for highway driving, as suggested by the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP).

Highway Driving Safety Tips

1. Merging: If you accelerate quickly to a proper merge speed, you can safely enter the flow of traffic.

2. Others merging: Change lanes or adjust your speed to allow others to enter the highway safely.

3. Blind spots: Stay out of other drivers’ blind spots.

4. Passing: Use the right lane for entering and exiting the traffic flow. The left lane on highways is for passing. Do not frustrate other drivers behind you by staying in the left lane if you are not passing.

5 Lane changes: Avoid unnecessary lane changes. Check your blind spots by looking over your shoulder before changing lanes. Always use turn signals.

6. Blending with traffic: Blend your speed with the traffic as much as possible without exceeding the speed limit. If you are uncomfortable driving at higher speeds, find an alternate route.

7. Stopped vehicles: Give pedestrians and stopped vehicles, including police and emergency vehicles, a wide berth for their safety, moving over a lane when possible.

8. Backing up: It is illegal to back up on a highway and you may not cross a median. If you miss an exit or need to go back for some reason, do not back up. Proceed to the next exit and then double back.

9. Emergencies: Do not stop on a highway unless you have an emergency. Pull over as far as you can to the shoulder and be sure to turn on your emergency flashers.

10. Emergency vehicles: Move to the right as far as possible to let an approaching emergency vehicle pass you on the left. Do not come to a complete stop as you would on other roads.

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If it’s an option, taking the highway may result in less time spent in the car, as compared to driving only on local roads. While highway driving is an efficient choice for drivers, there is always a chance that a car accident may occur.  That's why having knowledge on these extra highway driving guidelines may help prevent car accidents. Following these tips don't guarantee that accident's won't occur, but the AARP’s ten tips are a great safety refresher for all drivers, including beginners and experienced drivers alike. 


Although the cause of the crash on Tuesday has not yet been disclosed, it’s a reminder of the danger highway car accidents pose. The AARP’s ten highway driving safety guidelines are simple to follow, and may help drivers stay protected while driving on the highway. If you or someone you know has been the victim of an automobile accident, call The Michigan Law Firm, PC at 844.4MI.FIRM for a free legal consultation. Our team of accident attorneys are here to help car accident victims identity and receive any benefits they may be entitled to under Michigan law.

10 Year Old Takes Mom's Car for a Joyride

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A kid stealing a car and speeding around town and on the highway may seem like something out of an action movie or a video game, but a very real joyride happened just south of the Michigan border last month. According to USA Today, on October 26, 2017, a 10-year old from northern Ohio lead police from multiple departments as well as state highway troopers on a high speed chase through his town and eventually onto the Ohio Turnpike in a stolen vehicle.

The boy had stolen his mom’s 2004 Toyota Avalon, and began driving it through his neighborhood in Westlake, Ohio. A police officer saw the boy go speeding by at around 9:30 AM, and was being chased by another vehicle that was driven by the boy’s mother. Police were also tipped off to the joyride by two 911 calls. One caller reported the vehicle swerving in and out of lanes and running other vehicles off the road. A second caller said the boy appeared to be traveling at speeds of 90 mph or higher.

Two other police vehicles began chasing the boy, following him for about 15 miles. They tried to stop him from entering the interstate, but failed. Once he entered the interstate, he drove through a toll both on the Ohio Turnpike, at which point 4 other police vehicles joined the chase. The police vehicles formed a moving road block, in order to the slow the boy down, who at the point was reaching speeds of 100 MPH. The chase on the interstate lasted about 20 miles, before the boy eventually pulled over into a grassy area. A police vehicle gently bumped up against the boy’s vehicle in order to prevent him from reentering the highway. Reportedly, police motioned to the boy to pull over several times, which he responded to by shaking his head no. Luckily, no was injured in the chase.

WKYC reported that once the boy finally pulled over, he was taken first to a hospital, and then placed in the custody of Erie County Children’s Services. The boy was reportedly very combative with police, kicking and spitting at officers once he had pulled over. Remarkably, this is the second time in only two weeks that he has taken one of his parent’s cars for a joyride. On October 16, 2017, he stole a Dodge Charger and lead police on a very similar chase. Currently, police are speaking with the Erie County Prosecutor’s Office about criminal charges.  

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The boy is not the only one who could be facing criminal charges. While laws vary by state, the boy’s parents could be held responsible for his actions to some degree. If this situation took place in Michigan, according to Michigan law, the parent only faces criminal charges if they were involved in a child’s “bad act,” or if they had knowledge the child was planning to commit a bad act. In 2003, the Michigan Court of Appeals ruled “parents may be held liable for failing to exercise the control necessary to prevent their children from intentionally harming others if they know or have reason to know of the necessity and opportunity for doing so.” More so, parents of a child who commits a crime may have to pay for any damages they caused if they child is unable to pay for them.

Joyrides such as this one may sound far fetched, but they do need to be taken seriously. While statistics on underage kids taking cars for joyrides are unavailable, it only takes a quick Google search to know that they do happen, and that they can be extremely dangerous. Parents need to ensure that their car keys are never left out in the open for children to take, as well as make sure their kids know how dangerous it is for them to operate a car. It may sound like something that could never happen to you or your child, but cars are fancy, secretive objects that can be very appealing for a child to try and get their hands on. Once behind the wheel however, a child's lack of experience in driving, a lack of education in road rules, and shorter stature may lead to the child causing a car accident. 


A child speeding down the highway is never something a driver expects to see, much less knows how to respond to. Highways are dangerous enough for the most seasoned driver, and having a child driver only increases the risk of a car crash happening. If you have been involved in an automobile accident, call The Michigan Law Firm, PLLC at 844.4MI.FIRM for a free legal consultation. 

Michigan Leads Development of Smart Roadways

Michigan is looking to lead the nation in developing smart road technology that will allow intersection signals and construction zones to alert next generation vehicles about upcoming red lights, lane closures, and traffic areas ahead. According to The Detroit News, General Motors and Macomb County, Michigan have partnered up to begin testing smart road safety features that can tell future cars to begin braking when traffic lights are about to turn red. Michigan has also begun testing 'connected construction zones' on Interstate 75 in Oakland County that can alert cars with 'vehicle-infrastructure-capability' about upcoming lane closures. Vehicle-infrastructure-capability allows vehicles to communicate with roadways, construction zones and traffic signals through smart technology.

Michigan Smart Car Crash Lawyer

These 'connected construction zones' operate by advanced-tech roadside bar codes that are able to communicate information from construction zones to oncoming vehicles. These smart traffic signal systems can even tell the difference between construction workers from traffic barrels for the safety of both the worker and driver as well. Reportedly, these roadside bar codes are intended to be the system that will navigate autonomous vehicles in the future. Michigan has already established 100 miles of connected roadways and plans to expand to 350 miles in the future. Automakers and auto suppliers alike in Southeast Michigan have already begun planning for this transition by testing autonomous vehicle technology on Michigan roadways.

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Citizens of Michigan who are interested in knowing what these road signals look like, should look out for bar codes signs with black and white 2D codes that have been implemented on I-75 in Oakland County. These signs appear to be QR codes that can be scanned by smartphones, however, they can only be read by test cars with vehicle-infrastructure intuition. 3M Company provided these signs for Michigan, and Tammy Meehan, global portfolio manager for 3M Connected Roads, explains that these signs contain pinpoint GPS navigation, can alert vehicles of upcoming construction zones, and can estimate the time it takes to drive through work zones. These smart traffic signal systems can even tell the difference between construction workers from traffic barrels for the safety of both the worker and driver as well. 

Outside the GM Tech Center in Warren, advanced technology has been implemented into traffic lights by Macomb County on Mound Road between 12 Mile Road and 13 Mile Road. These lights are able communicate with Cadillac CTS test sedans that possess vehicle-infrastructure capability. The Detroit News reports that the smart traffic signals and sensors calculate the driver’s speed and the time in which the traffic signal will turn red, to determine if the driver needs to begin braking. In such a case, a yellow light glows on the driver’s infotainment screen and their seat begins vibrating. This is intended to prevent the driver from running the red light or crashing into another vehicle.  The smart traffic signals work within a 1,000-foot radius.

Mark Hackel, Macomb County Executive, stated that for the past five years Macomb's infrastructure department has been installing advanced sensors and cameras to develop smart highways. Hackel explains that the partnership with GM, in addition to the $13.5 million-dollar creation of the Communications and Technology Center (COMTEC) that opened in Mount Clemens in 2013, have been a part of the County’s ongoing infrastructure investments. COMTEC has allowed for the development of Michigan traffic-monitoring, weather-mapping, road-department cameras, and a video wall with 40 monitors.

Kirk Steudle, Director of the Michigan Department of Transportation, stated that Michigan continues to partner with automakers and suppliers for the research and development of autonomous vehicles and smart technology. Kirk claims that advanced vehicle-infrastructure communication could reduce 80% of car accident fatalities.

I-75 Car Accident Lawyer

While Michigan making great headway, it is not alone in its efforts to develop smart roadways. Other states, including Ohio, have begun testing and implementing connected roadways as well. Ohio has decided to invest $15 million into developing the U.S. 33 Smart Mobility Corridor using advanced fiber-optic cables and wireless sensors for connected roadway and autonomous vehicle testing. Ohio plans to expand connected roadways to I-270 and I-90 as well.

The smart technology innovation that Michiganders are experiencing before them will transform the way we mobilize, by making transportation far more efficient and safer. The ability for autonomous vehicles and connected highways to communicate may greatly reduce car accident fatalities in the future. Yet, it will still be some time before Michigan citizens are able to experience this transformation. In the meanwhile, The Michigan Law Firm, PLLC will continue to update blog readers on the development of smart roadway technology and its effects on drivers in Michigan and across the country.


Whether you've been involved in an auto accident with with a driverless car or were struck by a negligent driver, call The Michigan Law Firm, PLLC at 844.4MI.FIRM. for a free consultation. Our firm assists victims of car accidents in recouping any benefits they may be entitled to under Michigan law.